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Symposium Highlights

The 2011 Cybersecurity Breakfast Symposium at University of Maryland University College (UMUC), October 6, 2011, featured leaders and thinkers from the forefront of cybersecurity. Watch the videos below as industry leaders take a critical look at the state of cybersecurity today—how far we've come, what we've accomplished, and whether we're safer and more secure because of it.

Watch Now! The State of Cybersecurity Today

Part 1: Welcome

Part 2: Introductions of Honored Guests
Part 3: Panel Discussion
Part 4: Question and Answer Session
Part 5: Closing Remarks

 
 
 
 
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Highlights include...

  • The Honorable Ben Cardin (D-MD), who recently held field hearings on cybersecurity and small business, talks about the alarming threats to American economic competitiveness and national security in cyberspace and the need for legislation that will produce minimum security standards for anyone operating on the information superhighway.
  • Lt. Gen. Harry D. Raduege (USAF, Ret.), chairman, Deloitte Center for Cyber Innovation, argues that a tactical cyber Cold War is already underway, and suggests that an effective national defense lies in a cybersecurity triad, built on resilience, recognition, and retaliation.
  • Melissa Hathaway, president of Hathaway Global Strategies, LLC, comments that language matters and that we must be careful how we frame intrusions, making the appropriate distinctions. Are they attacks or are they crimes? Each characterization constitutes a very different way of looking at intrusions and activates different authorities.
  • Jeff Green, senior counsel on the majority staff of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, offers a cautious assessment of our national cybersecurity progress when the challenge keeps moving. He observes that there is a broad awareness in Congress that cybersecurity is a critical problem and that key agreement exists on the things that need to be done. Still, the window for action is a narrow one.
  • John Maguire, professional staff member and liaison to Senator Olympia Snowe at the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, voices concern that widely reported security breaches haven't galvanized the public to action, and talks about regulatory changes, such as including cyber exposure as part of materiality risk in SEC filings, to prompt the market to take the cyber threat to industry more seriously.