UMUC Provost Testifies on Cybersecurity Before U.S. Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship

Provost Greg von Lehmen testifies at field hearing, entitled “The Role of Small Business in Strengthening Cybersecurity Efforts in the United States”


July 27, 2011

ADELPHI, Md. (July 27, 2011) – University of Maryland University College (UMUC) Provost Greg von Lehmen testified Monday, July 25, 2011, before the U.S. Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship in a field hearing entitled, “The Role of Small Business in Strengthening Cybersecurity Efforts in the United States.” The field hearing focused on the role played by small businesses in strengthening cybersecurity efforts in the United States. Senator Ben Cardin of Maryland chairs the committee and presided over the hearing.  

“Our university is exceptionally well-positioned to shape the course of cyber education going forward, given its healthy track record in IT degree program development; its ongoing relationships with numerous federal intelligence agencies and contractors; and its large contingent of clearance-ready students, . . .” said von Lehmen. “The vast majority of these graduate students—around 89 percent—have at least five years of professional experience in IT, information assurance, computer security, or cybersecurity, across all sectors of the economy, while 61 percent of them hold security clearances. Moreover, a significant number of these enterprising students will undoubtedly use their new skills to launch businesses of their own.”  

UMUC launched one undergraduate and two graduate degree programs in cybersecurity and cybersecurity policy in fall 2010; to date, more than 2,000 students have enrolled. According to a statement from Cardin’s office announcing the hearing, support for cybersecurity is driving job growth in Maryland, with more than 50 key security and intelligence federal facilities and 12 major military installations already or soon to be located in the state. Combined, these facilities and installations are expected to employ nearly 200,000 well educated and highly skilled workers.