HIST Course Listing

World History I (HIST 115, 3 Credits)
Recommended: WRTG 112 or WRTG 101. A survey of global civilizations from prehistory to the 1500s. The aim is to explain the impact of environmental conditions on the development of civilizations using basic geographical knowledge; describe how human contacts, global connections, and migrations contribute to the development of civilizations; and compare the development of institutions (social, political, familial, cultural, and religious) to explain their impact on societal transformations. Focus is on examining what history is and thinking critically about history by analyzing historical approaches and methods.

World History II (HIST 116, 3 Credits)
Recommended: WRTG 112 or WRTG 101. A survey of global civilizations from the 1500s to the present. The aim is to explain the development of new political and economic systems using basic geographical knowledge; describe how human contacts, global connections, and migrations contribute to the development of nations and global systems; and compare the development of institutions (social, political, familial, cultural, and religious) to explain their impact on societal transformations. Focus is on examining what history is and thinking critically about history by analyzing historical approaches and methods.

Technological Transformations (HIST 125, 3 Credits)
A focused survey of the intersection of technology and history and the evolutionary process that marks what we call progress. The objective is to apply historical precedent to everyday responsibilities and relationships in order to advance the goals and ideals of contemporary society; compare and contrast historical eras; and describe how events influence our sense of time, space, and technology.

Western Civilization I (HIST 141, 3 Credits)
Recommended: WRTG 112 or WRTG 101. A survey of the history of Western civilization from antiquity through the Reformation. The objective is to chart major societal changes; identify major conflicts and wars; describe the evolution of religions; and recognize how philosophy and the arts reflect and influence peoples' lives, cultures, and societies. The political, social, and intellectual developments that formed the values and institutions of the Western world are examined.

Western Civilization II (HIST 142, 3 Credits)
Recommended: WRTG 112 or WRTG 101. A survey of the history of Western civilization from the Reformation to modern times. The goal is to chart major societal changes; identify major conflicts and wars; describe the evolution of religions; and recognize how philosophy and the arts reflect and influence peoples' lives, cultures, and societies.

History of the United States to 1865 (HIST 156, 3 Credits)
A survey of the United States from colonial times to the end of the Civil War. The establishment and development of national institutions are traced. The aim is to locate, evaluate, and use primary and secondary sources and interpret current events and ideas in a historical context. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: HIST 156 or HUMN 119.

History of the United States Since 1865 (HIST 157, 3 Credits)
A survey of economic, intellectual, political, and social developments since the Civil War. The objective is to use primary and secondary sources to describe U.S. historical events and interpret current events and ideas in a historical context. Discussion covers the rise of industry and the emergence of the United States as a world power. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: HIST 157 or HUMN 120.

Principles of War (HIST 202, 3 Credits)
A study of the nine classic principles that guide the conduct of war at the strategic, operational, and tactical levels and form the foundation of the art and science of the military profession. The aim is to use primary and secondary historical resources to explore how past theory and practice have shaped the underlying policy, strategic planning, and operational procedures of today's military and national security agencies.

Historical Methods (HIST 289, 3 Credits)
Prerequisite: A 100-level HIST course. An introduction to historical methods, approaches, and techniques. The goal is to explain what history is and why it matters, identify historical paradigms, and employ the moral and ethical standards of the historical profession. Focus is on the philosophical and practical skills employed by historians.

Historical Writing (HIST 309, 3 Credits)
Prerequisite: HIST 289. A study of the historical research and writing process. The goal is to construct a framework for an original historical research project, locate and evaluate source materials, and demonstrate proficiency in research methods.

The American West (HIST 316L, 3 Credits)
An examination of the exploration, settlement, development, and mythology of the American West, from 1490 to 1990, with attention paid to the role of the West as a key factor in the formation of national identity. Assignments include advanced reading and research.

The Roman Republic (HIST 326, 3 Credits)
Prerequisite: Any writing course. A study of ancient Rome during the period 753 to 44 BC, from its founding to the assassination of Julius Caesar. The goal is to use primary and secondary historical resources to explore Roman thought and demonstrate its influence in the modern Western world and apply it to modern contexts. Focus is on Rome's conquest of the Mediterranean world, the social and political pressures that led to that conquest, and the consequent transformation and decline of the republic. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: HIST 326 or HIST 421.

Europe's Bloodiest Century (HIST 337, 3 Credits)
An investigation of the political, economic, and cultural development of Europe since 1914, with emphasis on the factors involved in the two world wars and their worldwide effects and significance. The objective is to evaluate causes, courses, and consequences of armed conflicts in Europe during the 20th century to interpret their effects on contemporary society.

Recent America: 1945 to the Present (HIST 365, 3 Credits)
Prerequisite: A writing course. Recommended: WRTG 291. An investigation of U.S. history from the end of World War II to the events of September 11, 2001. The goal is to identify events, individuals, movements, and technological developments; synthesize primary and secondary resources; and analyze the significance of social, cultural, and political events. Topics include social turmoil, the Cultural Revolution, the role of the United States in the world, economic trends, military conflicts, consumerism, political and public scandals, and globalization.

U.S. Women's History: 1870 to 2000 (HIST 377, 3 Credits)
An examination of the history of women in the United States from 1870 to the eve of the 21st century. The goal is to examine primary and secondary sources and documents to comprehend and articulate the impact of gender on the historical experiences of American women. Historical methodologies that focus on the ways in which race, class, ethnicity, and sexuality have shaped these experiences are used to analyze the varied experiences of U.S. women. The relationship between these experiences and the larger historical forces of the era including social movements, technology, and changing family roles and structure is evaluated. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: HIST 211, HIST 367, or HIST 377.

America in Vietnam (HIST 381, 3 Credits)
Prerequisite: A writing course. Recommended: WRTG 291. An examination of the complexity of the lengthy involvement of the United States in Vietnam. The goal is to engage in divergent historical interpretations and develop personal conclusions and perspectives about America's role in Vietnam and its legacy. Discussion covers the social, cultural, political, and military dimensions of the Vietnam War, beginning with the declaration of Vietnamese independence at the conclusion of World War II. Emphasis is on influence of the media in shaping government policy and public opinion. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BEHS 337 or HIST 381.

History of the Contemporary Middle East (HIST 392, 3 Credits)
Prerequisite: A writing course. Recommended: WRTG 291. A survey of the history of the Middle East from the late 19th century to the present. The aim is to identify the important events of the last century in the Middle East; understand the sources of contention in that area; and examine the ideology, politics, and culture of the area and how they impact U.S.-Middle East relations. Focus is on major political, economic, social, and cultural trends that inform current events in the region. Topics include the late Ottoman Empire, European colonialism, the rise of nationalism and nation-states, the Arab-Israeli conflict, political Islam, the role of the United States in the region, and contemporary approaches to modernity in the Middle East.

African American History: 1865 to the Present (HIST 461, 3 Credits)
Prerequisite: A writing course. Recommended: WRTG 291. An examination of African Americans in the United States since the Civil War. The objective is to examine the significance of the emancipation of African Americans and various leadership and philosophical perspectives within the African American community. Topics include emancipation and Reconstruction; segregation, accommodationism, and institution building; migration and urbanization; resistance and the birth and growth of the civil rights movement; and the problem of race and racism as a national issue with global impact in the modern world.

The U.S. Civil War (HIST 462, 3 Credits)
An examination of the origins, conduct, and impact of the American Civil War and Reconstruction (1850-77). The goal is to apply historical methodology to issues of the Civil War and Reconstruction; assess Civil War strategies, tactics, and operations; and evaluate how race, culture, politics, and technology affected the course of the Civil War and Reconstruction.

World War I (HIST 464, 3 Credits)
Prerequisite: Any writing course. An intensive study of the First World War. Topics include the development of nationalism and socialism in late 19th-century Europe, the causes of the First World War, trench warfare on the western front, war in the Balkans, total war on the home fronts, the Russian Revolution of 1917, the collapse of the Central Powers, the 1918 settlements, the postwar conflicts that continued to haunt Europe until 1923, and the concept of the Lost Generation.

World War II (HIST 465, 3 Credits)
An investigation of the nature of the Second World War. The aim is to analyze the factors that contributed to World War II, investigate the influences of war-time ideologies, and examine how warfare accelerated advances in science and technology. Topics include the origins of the war; the political, military, economic, and social circumstances of the war and their impact and legacy; and the extent to which the war changed the world that we live in.

History of China to 1912 (HIST 480, 3 Credits)
A study of the history of China from Confucius (around 500 BC) to the demise of the Qing Dynasty in 1912. The objectives are to interpret, educate, and advise others based on a historical, cultural, and social awareness of traditional China. Emphasis is on the changes within Chinese political, social, cultural, and philosophical structures that have molded the history of China and its peoples.

History of Japan to 1800 (HIST 482, 3 Credits)
Prerequisite: A writing course. Recommended: WRTG 291. An examination of traditional Japanese civilization from the age of Shinto mythology to the late Edo period. The aim is to interpret, educate, and advise others based on a historical, cultural, and social awareness of traditional Japan.

History of Japan Since 1800 (HIST 483, 3 Credits)
Prerequisite: A writing course. Recommended: WRTG 291. An examination of Japan's emergence as an industrial society and world power. The goal is to interpret, educate, and advise others based on a historical, cultural, and social awareness of modern Japan. Discussion covers Japan's role in World War II, postwar recovery, and re-emergence as an exporter of cultural goods.

Workplace Learning in History (HIST 486A, 3 Credits)
Prerequisites: 9 credits in the discipline and prior program approval (requirements detailed online at www.umuc.edu/wkpl). The integration of discipline-specific knowledge with new experiences in the work environment. Tasks include completing a series of academic assignments that parallel work experiences.

Workplace Learning in History (HIST 486B, 6 Credits)
Prerequisites: 9 credits in the discipline and prior program approval (requirements detailed online at www.umuc.edu/wkpl). The integration of discipline-specific knowledge with new experiences in the work environment. Tasks include completing a series of academic assignments that parallel work experiences.

Senior Thesis in History (HIST 495, 3 Credits)
(Intended as a final, capstone course to be taken in a student's last 15 credits, preferably a year after completing HIST 309.) Prerequisites: At least 21 credits in HIST courses, including HIST 289 and HIST 309. Intensive research into a specific topic in history of the student's choice. The objective is to produce a substantial, original historical research project suitable for presentation or publication.